Five Books About Life as a Doctor #Connect5Books

I love reading books in which people share about their real life, including memoirs and diaries. I am also very interested in medicine. Today, I am joining in with Connect Five Books and sharing five books about life as a doctor.

1. For the Love of Babies by Sue Hall. This collection of stories from an American neonatologist is truly wonderful. I read it when it first came out in 2014 and it was one of my quickest reads at the time. As regular readers of my blog know, I was born prematurely and spent three months in the neonatal unit myself. However, in this book, Hall also shares about babies born with genetic syndromes or those born addicted to drugs their mothers used.

2. Cook County ICU by Cory Franklin. This book covers nearly fifty years of medical practice, from the author and his father, in an intensive care unit in Chicago. Franklin shares his experience becoming a doctor in the ICU very candidly, including how a supervisor tried to ruin his career because Franklin dared talk back to him. You’ll also read about some fascinating patients, such as some of the early cases of AIDS, before it was known to be AIDS.

3. Doctor’s Notes by Rosemary Leonard. This is a collection of stories by a south east London GP. I took a lot longer to read it than I did the above two books, but once I got into it, it was truly enjoyable.

4. Do No Harm by Henry Marsh. This is a book by a neurosurgeon. I have read a few chapters, but can’t seem to move along in it.

5. Tales From the Couch by Bob Wendorf. Okay, I’m cheating here, as Wendorf isn’t a medical doctor. He’s a clinical psychologist. However, psychologists in the United States are often referred to as doctors too. Each chapter in this book focuses on a particular psychiatric condition. I haven’t read much of this book either yet, but would like to.

Do you enjoy reading about people’s real life or about medicine?

Fatigue (For Lack of a Better Word)

And yet again I did not blog for what feels like an eternity. To get myself back in the swing of things, I’m just opening the WordPress app and writing. I don’t know where this will lead.

I’ve been feeling off lately. Pretty fatigued. This is nothing new, even though when I talked to my staff about it, they originally wanted to chalk it up to my transition into the care facility.

The thing is, this fatigue thing or however to describe it, as well as what I can only describe as a slow decrease in cognitive energy, has been going on forever. I told my staff about it on Tuesday and told her I want to discuss it with the facility’s intellectual disability physician when I have an extensive introductory appointment with her in November. Not that I have an intellectual disability, but the physician wants to have an appt with me, so why not make use of it? That’s probably still going to happen, but the staff called the general practitioner anyway, because I have a history of vitamin and mineral deficiencies. The GP ordered bloodwork, of which I hope to get the results soon. I guess nothing’s up once again and that probably means that my vitamin B12 deficiency that I had in 2015 was indeed due to poor nutrition. Or something. I don’t know.

The annoying thing is, physically I appear fine. Intellectually probably too, simply because I have a lot of reserve. It’s easy to chalk this whole thing up to autistic burnout, but then again doesn’t one ever recover from that? And does it even get worse at the relatively early age of 33?

I still feel like a burden for raising this issue. I mean, yes, I’m more forgetful than I used to be, but I can probably still pass a mental state assessment. Besides, compared to my fellow residents, I’m like superhuman where it comes to independence. So yes, why even see the intellectual disability physician? But she wanted to see me, so yeah.

Last Tuesday, after I told the staff about my concerns, I felt very stressed. The staff was so very nice! She asked if I wanted to take a bath, but I initially declined, because I knew it was several other residents’ bath time. I know that I shouldn’t be filling in what other clients need, but well. Then she offered to take me to the sensory room at the day center. It was great. I still felt very unquiet mentally after it, but physically I could relax.

I’ve been using the sensory room more often these past few days. The staff in charge of the sensory group at day activities even bought me a blanket that’s mine alone to use when there. This kindness totally amazes me. Of course, I’m still waiting for the other shoe to drop, as I seem to have had so much experience of unhelpful support staff (to use an understatement) that I doubt there’s even ever a place where I can feel well cared for.