A Letter Explaining My Life Right Now

Today’s topic in 7 Days 7 Posts is to write a letter to someone explaining your life right now. I have been thinking about reconnecting with the head nurse from the psychiatric resocialization unit for a while. She was one of the most supportive people I ever met during my psychiatric hospital stay, but still, she was a bit prejudiced. Here is a letter to her.

Dear K,

How are you? I hope you are well. Do you still work for the psychiatric hospital? When I last spoke to L (my named nurse from the resocialization unit), she informed me that the entire Nijmegen long-term care hospital was closing and moving to Wolfheze. Do you work there now?

When I last wrote to you and L, I explained that I was living with my husband in the tiny village and going to day activities. I didn’t inform you that I was struggling. I eventually got kicked out of my first day center with this agency and transferred to another one.

Still, I struggled with independent living with my husband. My husband is a truck driver now and his shifts are like 12 hours a day. For this reason, we finally applied for long-term care funding at the end of 2018, which after a long battle was granted in June of 2019. As of September, I live in a care facility for people with intellectual disability in Raalte. I know you didn’t want me to go into housing for people with intellectual disabilities. Well, I am happy here.

We involved the Center for Consultation and Expertise again when I was struggling at my first day center. The consultant psychologist assigned to my case assessed my needs. Among other things, she concluded that I function emotionally at a level of around 6-18 months.

I go to day activities at a group for older people with profound intellectual disability, most of whom live with me too. I go for almost daily walks. I love to go to the snoezelen® room too. I also do a weekly cooking activity with the staff intern. It’s sometimes difficult to figure out activities I can do, because the other clients mostly just sit around and I almost need one-on-one support with most activities.

I am still married to my husband. We bought a house in Lobith, but this is mostly for him to live in and for me to go to on week-ends.

I still see the mental health team, but have decided not to pursue any formal therapy program for now. Dialectical behavior therapy, which I used to try, didn’t work out because of my autism and my dissociative symptoms. I don’t feel comfortable going through the assessment for dissociation though.

Anyway, hope you are doing well. I suppose L is around retirement age now, but if she still works at the hospital and you still see her, send her my warm regards.

Astrid

A Day I Will Never Forget

I’m a day late with this topic in 7 Days 7 Posts. The Tuesday topic didn’t appeal to me and besides, I was really anxious then. Yesterday I had a lot of meetings to discusss my anxiety and the reasons for it. I made it clear that I really needed some more care and particularly more consistency and clarity in my day. I went to bed at 8:15PM, having taken an Ativan to help me sleep.

Yesterday’s topic was to describe a day you’ll never forget. I already described how I met my husband sometime during the #AtoZChallenge last April. Another day I will never forget, though for less pleasant reasons, is the day I landed in crisis in 2007. I probably described that day a few times before already, but right now I can’t find where. If you’ve read this before, I apologize.

On November 2, 2007, I was in my parents’ city to get a landline phone I wanted to use in my student apartment. The reason I wanted a landline was the fact that I was scared of mobile phone radiation causing Alzheimer’s. It’s weird that now I use my iPhone like all the time and don’t worry about it much.

I had come to my parents’ the previous evening and was planning on going back home to Nijmegen that Friday afternoon. However, on the train station, I had a meltdown. The police were called and removed me from the station.

I went to the independence training home where I used to live until that summer. I wasn’t really sure what I wanted, but I needed to look up some phone number on my laptop. I knew I shouldn’t go back to my parents’, as they’d probably be angry with me.

After having called whoever I needed to call, I wandered around the training home neighborhood for some hours, not sure what to do. At one point, a fellow client at the training home realized I was struggling, so she offered me to come into her apartment and stay for the night, so that we could find a more long-term solution the following day. However, the staff came to her and told me to leave. They weren’t going to take responsibility for me.

At that point, I had another meltdown. I walked to the nearby bus stop, catching the 8:01PM bus to the train station. In my memory, it was still light outside, even though that’s not possible at such a time in early November. I called my support coordinator to let her know I was going to commit suicide. The bus driver overheard me and called the police.

I was terribly scared, because the police had kicked me off the train station that afternoon. However, I willingly went with them to the police station. They called someone called a community physician, who is in charge of triaging people not known to that city’s mental health agency. He was a really blunt man, telling me that I made people feel responsible for me in a way as if I was just seeking attention. He even used a kind of threatening voice when he said he was going to call the crisis service. I didn’t mind.

The crisis service psychiatrist and CPN came out to the police station. After assessing me, they asked me what I wanted. To this day, I’m not sure whether I really didn’t know what I wanted or felt too embarrassed to ask for help. After all, when talking to the behavior specialist for my current care facility yesterday, I also said I didn’t know what I needed even though I did. Anyway, the psychiatrist proposed that I be admitted to the mental hospital and I agreed.

Three Wishes

I’m trying to participate in 7 Days 7 Posts organized by Jessica from Daysixtyfive. That is, I won’t promise I’ll complete the challenge, as I’m having a nasty cold. Yes, again. I hope I don’t end up with a fever this time. That being said, if it doesn’t get worse than it is now, I’ll probably be able to do fine.

Today’s topic is about wishes. You have just been granted three wishes. What are they?

I initially thought that we’re supposed to have big, world-changing wishes like peace everywhere. Then I saw Jessica’s post and her first two wishes are just for herself and her family. Maybe we all are self-centered like this, so I don’t need to feel shameful about wishing stuff for just myself. Here goes.

1. Physical and mental wellbeing. I purposefully wish for wellbeing, not health, as the genie might interpret health to mean I want to get cured of my disabilities. I don’t. I want to remain blind and autistic and having mild cerebral palsy. I even don’t want to be cured of my dissociative disorder, in that I want to remain multiple. What I do want is to be is stable mentally, less anxious. I also want my chronic physical ailments to go away. And while we’re here, I wish this nasty cold away and not to return.

2. To be close to my husband. I would wish for a suited care facility in my husband’s area, so that I could visit him more often. A suited care facility would be much like the one I’m in now, with a day center on grounds, lots of sensory equipment, the staffing level for me to be able to enjoy regular leisure activities, etc.

3. Unlimited ParaTransit access. This was the first that came to mind after a care facility close by my husband. Bigger things like wellbeing hadn’t even come to mind yet. I could wish for an endless stream of money, so that I can hire my own taxi drivers, but I don’t think I’d feel any better then. However, the ability to travel wherever I want without having to worry about public transportation, is very high on my list of desires. Interestingly, for the cost it took to make all trains and buses wheelchair-accessible, the government could have made this a reality for all majorly disabled people.

What would you wish for if you were granted three wishes?