A College Memory

One of Mama Kat’s writing prompts for this week is to write about a college memory. I wrote about the very same topic on my old blog in 2016, some weeks after it was also a prompt on Mama Kat’s blog. I reread that post just now and was actually going to share the exact same memory. Now I don’t think most people who read my blog now, read my blog then. Still, I want to choose a different memory.

In 2016, I shared the memory of my first day at Radboud University as a linguistics major. I had a massive meltdown upon entering the lecture hall then, because I hadn’t known that there were over 200 students in there. I left and called my support coordinator, who took me to her office. This was the first time the psychiatric crisis service was called on me, but they said I wasn’t “mad enough” (my support coordinator’s words) to be admitted to the hospital.

Roughly eight weeks later, on October 30, I had my last day at Radboud University. I didn’t know it at the time, of course, since I wasn’t admitted to the mental hospital until November 3.

I had an exam that morning. It was my first introduction to language and communication exam. Passing this exam wouldn’t award me any credits, as the credits for the course weren’t applied until you passed the second exam some weeks later.

As always, I took a ParaTransit taxi to the university that morning. I think I had a meltdown right as I went into the building the exam was supposed to be held in, but I’m not 100% sure. I definitely had a meltdown when I was finished. The taxi driver driving me home threatened to dump me at the police station.

Regardless, I did sit in on the exam. Introduction to language and communication is basically a course in dissecting words into morphemes and sentences into their different components (no idea what those are called). That’s why the course was also sometimes called universal grammar.

Several months later, when I was home on leave from the hospital, I retrieved my E-mails. Back at the hospital, I sat down to read them. Among them was an E-mail from the director of studies telling me that the intro to lang and comm instructor had been missing me so had I dropped out? I also found an E-mail from administration notifying me of my grade on the exam: I scored 85%.

Several months ago, when my husband was clearing out the attic for our move to our current home, he found a letter from Radboud University. It was my provisional report on whether I could continue my studies or not. “Your studying results are grounds for concern,” it said. I’m so glad I never saw this piece before.

Mama’s Losin’ It

11 thoughts on “A College Memory

  1. Subunits of sentences: Lexemes? [lex=word/law – emes]

    I also call them semantic units. #kitchenlinguistics

    And I’m glad you didn’t see that report from the university about your studies being of concern.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. College is tough! I never had issues with the bigger lecture halls, so it’s hard for me to put myself in your shoes. But I can’t imagine the agony it must be for someone who wouldn’t be comfortable there for whatever reason. My only issue was I always had to try to find a seat as close to the front as possible, because I’m almost deaf, hearing aids wouldn’t help at the time, and I needed to be able to hear the lecturer.

    I hope you’re able to manage things so that you’re comfortable now!

    Kim

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Such a well written post. I am myself supposed to graduate this year.
    You remember even little details of memories that’s just amazing ❤
    Following you right away 🙂

    I have also written a blog describing lessons i learnt in my graduation years. Do give it a read. Also let's connect over wordpress ❤

    Liked by 1 person

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