Prescription Meds Can Be Part of Good Self-Care #AtoZChallenge

Welcome to my rather late letter P post in the #AtoZChallenge. Today I want to talk about the role prescription meds, particularly psych meds, can play in good self-care. Because you know, there is still a lot of stigma attached to taking psychiatric medications or certain medications for physical health, such as opioids. Of course, medication isn’t for everyone and that’s normal. If you do experience serious mental health issues or physical ailments, it’s not weak to ask for meds.

You know, I didn’t take care of myself with respect to my medications until I was 31. Before that, I had subconsciously assumed I wasn’t taking meds for self-care, but rather to please others. That’s how psych meds had been used on me for years in mental health, since irritability (ie. being a pain in other people’s necks) was supposedly my main symptom. Well, it isn’t and even if it were, my irritability is a worse experience for me than it is for others. I mean, I’ve known people, such as those diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder, say they have a problem but don’t suffer. That’s okay, but it is rarer than to suffer in silence.

In early 2018, I finally decided I needed help for my depression. As those who read my blog regularly know, I was already on a low dose of an antidepressant, but had no idea why. I didn’t feel comfortable asking directly for a med increase. Let me tell you, however, suggesting specific med adjustments to your doctor doesn’t make you a drug seeker. They may know meds best, but you know you best.

Also, while meds won’t make you happy, you don’t have to settle for mediocre health if there are still options out there. And if you want to lessen a medication dose or stop it altogether, that’s okay to discuss with your doctor too.

Once you do get on the right meds, it’s your responsibility to make sure you take them as prescribed. Certain meds need to be taken right on time or they’ll not work as effectively. I’ve heard this is the case for antidepressants, so I really need to get back on track with taking my morning dose on time. Other meds cannot be taken together or should or shouldn’t be taken with certain foods. For example, when I took iron supplements, I didn’t know at first that it’s recommended you not consume them with dairy products. You don’t need to read everything that’s in the information on a medication you’ve been prescribed, particularly if you’re hypervigilant about side effects. However, you do need to take your medication as directed.

10 thoughts on “Prescription Meds Can Be Part of Good Self-Care #AtoZChallenge

  1. Agree, although having one or another medication adjustment is a weird feeling until we can settle with the right one, I´ve learned that to cope with fibromyalgia, migraine and asthma, there are certain medications I just can´t overlook. The first ones I took against migraine were antidepressants, so you can imagine how I felt about myself needing them. Anyway, doctors took them away from me, as they found different meds that my body accepted better and with a lesser dosage.

    Liked by 1 person

        1. That prejudice is so relatable. My family didn’t really believe in mental illness unless you were like schizophrenic or something. They also thought I was a hypochondriac (which they didn’t see as a real condition) because of my “vague” issues.

          I’m so glad you eventually found the right doctors.

          Liked by 1 person

            1. Oh I’m sorry you had doctors actually tell you this. I don’t think one is worse than the other, since both doctors and family can do a lot of harm by not believing you.

              Liked by 1 person

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